Claimed from Stationer’s Hall – Update

Earlier this year we published a blog post by Dr Karen McAulay of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland about her research using the St Andrews Copyright Music Collection – https://standrewsrarebooks.wordpress.com/2016/08/18/claimed-from-stationers-hall-st-andrews-copyright-music-collection/

Copyright Music Collection in the stacks

Copyright Music Collection in the stacks

 

An example of a volume in the copyright music collection - Challoner’s New Guida di Musica, ‘improved edition’ (London: Skillern, [1812]), St Andrews University Library sM1.A4M6; 141’]

An example of a volume in the copyright music collection – Challoner’s New Guida di Musica, ‘improved edition’ (London: Skillern, [1812]), St Andrews University Library (sM1.A4M6; 141).

Karen has continued her research and has now written an update, available on her blog at:

https://karenmcaulay.wordpress.com/claimed-from-stationers-hall/

Karen will be returning to St Andrews in due course – we look forward to welcoming her back to the Reading Room and to future updates as she continues to unravel the history of this collection.

2 responses to “Claimed from Stationer’s Hall – Update

  1. Pingback: Echoes from the Vault Re-Echoed | Karen McAulay Teaching Artist·

  2. Reblogged this on Claimed From Stationers' Hall and commented:
    There’s a Scottish saying, “What goes around, comes around”. I didn’t realise, when we selected the image from Challoner’s New Guida di Musica for this blogpost, that I would encounter it again in a later stage of my research! Whilst tweeting for the new AHRC-funded music network, Claimed from Stationers’ Hall, I idly looked to see what was registered “on this day” a couple of hundred years ago. Stretching a point slightly, I chanced upon – yes, Challoner’s piano instructor, for that’s what it actually is – registered at Stationers’ Hall on 24 September 1812. Checking my records further, I learned that the volume containing it was actually bound – and borrowed – within three months’ of registration, and clocked up 14 loans between 1812 and 1849. If you really want to, you can even “play like it was 1812” because it has been digitised at Baylor University:- http://digitalcollections.baylor.edu/cdm/ref/collection/fa-spnc/id/149327

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